Do Work You Love. Details

Frequently Asked Questions

Massage Therapy Program Frequently Asked Questions

 

How long is the program?

The 750-hour program takes ten months to complete.

 

What is the class schedule like?

You will attend classes three days per week, from 8:15 am to 4:50 pm, with several breaks of 10 minutes each and a lunch break of 55 minutes. Class sessions are two or four hours in length. A typical day might include a two-hour class in Anatomy, a two-hour class in Personal Development and a four-hour class in Swedish Massage.

 

Can I work while I attend school?

Yes. Most of our students have a part-time job while they are in the program. Because the program is academically challenging, and because there is a substantial amount of required homework, we encourage students to limit the number of hours that they work to 15 to 25 hours per week.

 

Does the Health Works Institute program fulfill the educational requirements for state licensing?

Yes. As of May, 2015, 44 states plus the territory of Puerto Rico have massage therapy license laws. Health Works Institute’s massage therapy program consists of 750 hours. The education requirements for licensing are as follows:  Montana requires 500 hours; 28 states require 500 to 599 hours; 10 states require 600 to 699 hours; 4 states require 700 to 749 hours; the only exception is the two states (New York and Nebraska) and Puerto Rico that require 1,000 hours.

 

Is the U.S. market saturated with too many massage therapists?

No. According to consumer surveys conducted by the American Massage Therapy Association in July, 2014, 23 percent of adults reported having a massage in the past twelve months. This means that there is a huge, untapped market of over 75 percent of American adults who are not receiving massage treatments. With the marketing strategies taught in Health Works’ Professional Development course, and with the advanced skills and knowledge provided by our 750-hour program, our graduates are ready to target people who are new to massage therapy. Our graduates know how to educate the public about the multitude of life-enhancing benefits of skillfully-applied treatments. Our graduates enjoy a distinct, competitive edge, because they consistently meet and exceed the expectations of their employers and clients, thus ensuring repeat visits and a large clientele of satisfied customers.

Also, the demand for massage therapy services continues to increase. According to the U.S. Department of Labor in 2013, employment for massage therapists is expected to increase 22% from 2014 to 2024 (much faster than average for all occupations). Massage therapy is now being provided in a broader range of settings, including hotels, medical spas, guest ranches, athletic training facilities, etc., and with a more diverse clientele, including disabled children, cancer patients, teenagers with anxiety and depression, elderly residents of nursing homes, and more. Results of research studies are documenting the many life-changing benefits of massage therapy for people with everything from daily stressors to heart disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, brain injuries, paralysis, and more. Numerous research reports may be accessed here or here.

 

Can people afford to pay the fees charged by massage therapists?

Yes. In the massage therapy program at Health Works, students provide treatments to members of the public who pay $35 per session. Many of our clients receive a massage each week; they are spending $140 per month to receive the benefits of massage therapy. If a massage therapist in private practice charges $70, many clients will be able to afford two sessions per month.

Also, clients are motivated to pay for massage therapy treatments when they have a need that well-trained massage therapists can meet. According to consumer surveys conducted by the American Massage Therapy Association in July, 2015, 91 percent of consumers surveyed believe that massage can be effective in reducing pain; with 28 percent of respondents stating they have used massage therapy for pain relief. Other strategies (pain medication, other types of therapies) may not have provided as much pain relief or other desired result, and this motivates clients to choose massage therapy as the best place to invest a portion of their health care dollars.

Esthetics Program Frequently Asked Questions

 

How long is the program?

The 900-hour program takes 11 months to complete.

 

What is the class schedule like?

You will attend classes three days per week, from 8:45 am to 5:20 pm, with several breaks of 10 minutes each and a lunch break of 55 minutes.

 

Can I work while I attend school?

Yes. Most of our students have a job while they are in the program. Because the program is academically challenging, and because there is a substantial amount of required homework, we encourage students to limit the number of hours that they work to 20 to 30 hours per week.

 

Does the Health Works Institute program fulfill the educational requirements for state licensing?

Yes.  The educational requirement for an esthetics license in Montana is 650 hours, and the Health Works Esthetics Program is 900 hours.  Forty-one states and Washington, D.C. have separate licenses for estheticians; the remainder of the states regulate esthetics as part of cosmetology. There are 9 states that require 250 to 450 hours; 25 states that require 600 to 650 hours; and 7 states that require 700 to 750 hours. Alabama and Virginia both require 1,500 hours.

 

Is the market already saturated with too many estheticians?

No. Esthetics has been recognized as a distinct, specialized occupation relatively recently; an indicator of this fact is that there are still 5 states that do not have an esthetics license separate from the cosmetologist license. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that jobs for estheticians are predicted to grow by 40% (much faster than average for all other jobs) between 2012 and 2022.  The Global Wellness Institute reports that esthetics is part of the wellness industry, because it is part of the beauty and anti-aging industry and the spa industry. The wellness industry is now a $3.4 trillion market, and one of the biggest, fastest-growing industries in the world; it is 3.4 times the size of the $1 trillion, global pharmaceutical industry. As consumers have come to understand that good skin care is an essential part of overall health care, and as the demand for anti-aging treatments has increased exponentially, the need for well-trained estheticians is increasing every year.

 

Will I learn about natural and organic options for skin care products?

Yes! This is an important focus in our program. In the Chemistry course, you will learn about the multitude of product ingredients, how they are manufactured, and what result they are intended to produce for the client. You will learn to identify carcinogenic ingredients, and you will learn about natural and organic substances that can be used instead. You’ll even create your own products from yogurt, organic juice concentrates, sugar, oatmeal and other natural ingredients.

 

How does the Health Works Institute program prepare me to succeed financially as an esthetician?

First and foremost, you will have comprehensive knowledge and skills, and a high level of confidence, which will give you a competitive edge as soon as you enter the field of esthetics.  Also, you will have your certifications in both Microdermabrasion and Lash Extensions.

The Professional Development course provides excellent preparation for each student to achieve his/her professional goals, as follows:

  • If the student’s goal is to obtain a job as an employee, the student is provided step-by-step guidance to identify the employers for whom they would like to work, arrange to be interviewed by the employer, and continue this process until the student has received a job offer that she/he is ready to accept. These steps are taken whether the employer is local or in another city or state, and these steps are completed before graduation.
  • If the student’s goal is to establish a home-based private practice, the student is given step-by-step guidance to select an appropriate space in their home where they will conduct their private practice, purchase equipment and supplies, and take other steps to establish their practice. These steps are completed before graduation.
  • If the student’s goal is to establish a private practice or a related business (e.g. day spa) in a rented commercial space, the student is required to select the location, negotiate a lease, and take other steps to establish their practice. These steps will be taken regardless of the student’s intention to work in our area or move to another city or state, and these steps are completed before graduation.

Another requirement of the Professional Development course is that all students are required to create a Professional Portfolio to provide to prospective employers, and all students learn strategies for succeeding financially as an employee, including:   assisting your employer in building and sustaining a large clientele through affordable marketing strategies; achieving a high level of job performance and therefore becoming eligible for salary raises and promotions; etc.

As a requirement of the Professional Development course, all students are required to write a complete Business Plan for establishing a private practice.  Emphasis is placed on:  realistic and specific budgets; up-to-date promotional strategies including social media marketing; customer service strategies that to achieve a high rate of clients who re-book regularly; etc.

Health Works Institute
Share This